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Microsoft Graphics

Microsoft's Age-Old Image Library 'Clip Art' Is No More 110

hypnosec writes Microsoft has finally bid a goodbye to the age-old Clip Art image library found in its Office products as its usage has been declining over the years. Redmond replaced the Clip Art's online image library with Bing Image Search. This means that people searching for online images inside an Office app will now be directed to a gallery powered by Bing Images that will bring in results from around the web. Bing's copyright filter based on the Creative Commons licensing system will let users get royalty-free images which they can use, share, or modify for either personal or commercial use.
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Microsoft's Age-Old Image Library 'Clip Art' Is No More

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday December 02, 2014 @09:01AM (#48505787)

    Another feature that was previously offline that has now been replaced with an online only feature that will track you.

    I have nothing inherently against online features but the fact that they /always/ go hand in hand with tracking causes me to be against.

    • The summary seems to imply that they were already tracking users and their usage of the clip art library.

      More and more it seems like just keeping Office XP or 2010 around is the best bet. How much you hate the ribbon would determine which one you keep, I guess.

      • At least with Office XP you don't have deal with the huge flaw in Word where it insists on displaying two pages side by side on the screen rather than one page at a time.

        Not being able to see one page without shifting around screen resolution and zoom levels is inexcusable, yet Microsoft apparently feels usability is far down the list of things it needs to worry about.

        Sort of like large portions of FOSS software.

        • What huge flaw? "View -> One Page". Done. No side-by-side page layouts.

          • No, it doesn't work because then the page is set to the left of the screen.

            What I and thousands of others want is for a single page, centered on the screen, just the way it used to be before Office 2010 came out.

            Without fiddling with your zoom level or screen resolution, this cannot (currently) be done.

          • by Anonymous Coward

            Heres a flaw: create a .doc in 2003 highlight some text and save it. Open it in 2010 and try to remove that highlighting.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Heaven forbid they improve features by letting you easily insert more images in to documents

      • Remove != Improve (Score:2, Interesting)

        by s.petry ( 762400 )

        You could already insert images into documents, so your statement is a fabrication. This removes an internal set of images which allowed you to insert images without an internet connection. This is not an improvement as you claim, because this simply removes a feature and does not add anything.

        The library has been hidden from users for a while, so it's not a shock that people don't use it as often today. Having the product depend on their search engine seems like another anti-trust case waiting to happen

        • Re:Remove != Improve (Score:5, Interesting)

          by quetwo ( 1203948 ) on Tuesday December 02, 2014 @10:10AM (#48506313) Homepage

          MS Clipart wasn't internal, or stored on your local PC since Microsoft Office 2003. It's gone online to download the clipart. In 2003 -> 2010 it cached them locally so that if you downloaded it once, it was cached on your computer so you could re-use it without having to download it again.

          What was nice about the Clipart was they were all vector-based images. Meaning they scaled nicely. All the images that come up using the Bing search are 300x400 or close -- which looks like crap if you try to use it. Sure, most of the images in the clipart library were pretty bad and way overused, but at least they were pixelated crap.

          • by binarybum ( 468664 ) on Tuesday December 02, 2014 @03:05PM (#48509619) Homepage

            exactly. I don't know why the responses here are so positive. Getting rid of a primarily vector based library that takes up little space and is available locally is not a great move at all. If you don't like it, fine don't use it. But your points are well taken - this move to online everything is tedious, slow, and frustrating. I need my documents in a cloud, but I sure don't need my bloody word processor in the cloud.
            Think Global, install Local.

          • MS Clipart wasn't internal, or stored on your local PC since Microsoft Office 2003.

            That could quite likely be the last time I was tempted to use clipart in a document.

            Probably around then, I snaffled a copy of an open clipart library. But I don't think I've needed to use it since. Try https://openclipart.org/downlo... [openclipart.org] for a DVD or two.

    • Or you could view it as a small clip art library being replaced with a much larger one. PCs aren't islands anymore, and it would be dumb to keep mostly unused clip art on your local machine. Is there any reason to be concerned about Microsoft knowing what legal clip art you use, or is that just the paranoia that has so many /. users so lost and confused these days?
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Put on your tinfoil hat and post A/C!!

    • Browse incognito?
  • by badger.foo ( 447981 ) <peter@bsdly.net> on Tuesday December 02, 2014 @09:06AM (#48505821) Homepage
    If I remember correctly, the OOXML ISO standard that was rushed through some years back included specifications for a clipart library not entirely unlike the Microsoft Office one. I suppose this move means that Microsoft has give up on adhering to its wholly-owned ISO standard.
  • by Somebody Is Using My ( 985418 ) on Tuesday December 02, 2014 @09:08AM (#48505829) Homepage

    Microsoft ClipArt365, a subscription-based online product where you can the entirety of MS's ClipArt library anywhere in the world*. Never worry about not having the right piece of ClipArt at your fingertips; just use our quick ClipSearch** feature and you'll have the right art at your fingerprints in moments! Then simply insert the art into your Word(tm) document, Excel(tm) spreadsheet or Powerpoint(tm) presentation with a single-click!***. All this for $12/mo or $120/year!

    * Internet connection required.
    ** Internet Explorer 12.1 or higher required
    *** Requires Office365 or higher. Art cannot be inserted into other documents. Internet connection required to view document with clipart.

    • Microsoft ClipArt365, a subscription-based online product where you can the entirety of MS's ClipArt library anywhere in the world*. Never worry about not having the right piece of ClipArt at your fingertips; just use our quick ClipSearch** feature and you'll have the right art at your fingerprints in moments! Then simply insert the art into your Word(tm) document, Excel(tm) spreadsheet or Powerpoint(tm) presentation with a single-click!***. All this for $12/mo or $120/year!

      Not sure I'd have even modded that funny. Right now, MS might be perfectly happy to play fast and loose with other peoples copyright, but it won't be long before they see a potential revenue stream and buy up someone like iStock.

    • I think you the verb.
    • by jez9999 ( 618189 )

      * Internet connection required.
      ** Internet Explorer 12.1 or higher required
      *** Requires Office365 or higher. Art cannot be inserted into other documents. Internet connection required to view document with clipart.

      I think you forgot:
      **** Service not guaranteed to be available 365 days a year.

  • Bing's copyright filter based on the Creative Commons licensing system will let users get royalty-free images which they can use, share, or modify for either personal or commercial use.

    How does that filter works? Do images have internal metadata about licensing? Or is "copyright filter" just another way of saying that searches will only occur on websites hosting Creative Commons photos and images?

    • by ihtoit ( 3393327 )

      I'm guessing it'll have a filter for a meta "Licenc(/s)e" field. Not all images will have this meta field, they'll be hidden from search results. Instant hit for those companies that have a deal with MS to fix the filters so their images are at the top of the return listings every time...

    • Based on this page [microsoft.com], I would say that it doesn't work at all:

      When you find an image that you want, go to the originating website for the image and determine the actual license for the image.

      • That's not a filter at all!

        Microsoft could try partnerships with at least a dozen photo hosting services to set a meta-data standard for all the licensing information required to be embedded into the JPEG and PNG files themselves. It would also be a good time to ask Apple and Google to join in the effort to establish such a standard.

  • How the hell will bing fibd vector graphics which clipart was and did windows also kill WMF format alobg or not?
  • It's usage has been declining? That would imply someone actually used it to begin with!
  • by sootman ( 158191 ) on Tuesday December 02, 2014 @09:58AM (#48506225) Homepage Journal

    For all the reasons outline here, [slashdot.org] unless MS is going to embed their own metadata into every image I use that promises the image is safe, and that if it isn't, MS will foot the bill. Even so, that won't help me if I print something and lose the original digital version with the metadata. Stupid, stupid, stupid.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    for repair technicians. Most of the virus cleanings I do come from people searching for images!

  • by Richy_T ( 111409 )

    How long until the EU breaks up this blatant attempt at bundling?

  • Bing's copyright filter based on the Creative Commons licensing system will let users get royalty-free images which they can use, share, or modify for either personal or commercial use.

    Sorry... you can't safely vet for copyright using an automated tool.

    What happens when someone mistakenly (or maliciously?) mislabels a copyright-protected work managed by a rights troll as CC0 or CCBY ?

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