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Android Cellphones Handhelds Microsoft Operating Systems

Since-Pulled Cyanogen Update For Oneplus Changes Default Home Page To Bing 87

ourlovecanlastforeve writes: Nestled into GSMArena's report on the Cyanogen OS 12.1 update for Oneplus [ Note: an update that the story reports has since been pulled.] is this tasty bite: "...you'll find out that your Chrome homepage has been changed to Bing." Then it's casually dismissed with "Thankfully though, you can easily get rid of Microsoft's search engine by using Chrome settings." as if this were the most normal thing to have to do after an OTA update. Is this the new normal? Has Microsoft set a new precedent that it's okay to expect users to have to go searching through every setting and proactively monitor network traffic to make sure their data isn't being stolen, modified or otherwise manipulated?
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Since-Pulled Cyanogen Update For Oneplus Changes Default Home Page To Bing

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 27, 2015 @08:00AM (#50401395)

    Hosts files. With 64-bit compatible appropriate hosts file management tools we could prevent the phone from ever connecting to Bing. I think we should hear APK hosts file guy's thoughts about this issue.

    • I think we should hear APK hosts file guy's thoughts about this issue.

      Wasn't some "Lord of Hosts" or something mentioned in the Bible? I, for one, welcome our new hosts files overlords. Or was that someone else?

    • wouldn't be surprised if they pulled a Windows and also helpfully use some hard-coded IP addresses, just so freeloaders like you still pay.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I kind of like a funny in-your-face subversive attack into the monopolist's territory by the underdog.

    Of course, the monopolist is Google and the underdog is Microsoft... except that the rapidly dwindling base of people around here who still think it's 1999 haven't realized that the world has changed out from underneath them. Go whine about the IE 6 monopoly!

    • by Rob Y. ( 110975 ) on Thursday August 27, 2015 @09:40AM (#50402105)

      This has nothing to do with whether Google has today's version of Microsoft's desktop monopoly (it doesn't, by the way). it has to do with silently changing a user preference. You might argue that a user doesn't want Google as the default search engine from the start - but if they're buying an Android device, at least they know the default search engine is Google - and they can change it. To quietly change the default without being asked is a whole other thing.

      Mozilla pulled this with its switch to Bing. It wasn't supposed to change the search engine for existing installations - but in some cases, it still did. I've even had it changed back to Bing after having switched it back to Google. Don't know if that happened in response to an update or what, but it's nasty.

      • You might argue that a user doesn't want Google as the default search engine from the start - but if they're buying an Android device, at least they know the default search engine is Google - and they can change it.

        You might argue that users neither care nor know that Chrome is a google product nor care nor know which search engine they are using.

        Every system these days seems to be funded by the default search option. That's why Chrome came into existence in the first place, to change the default search provider.

        • by Rob Y. ( 110975 )

          It's not that Chrome came about to change the default search provider. Users could certainly change the provider in IE easier than downloading and installing Chrome. There may have been some consideration towards keeping the ability to change it once Microsoft's antitrust remedies ran out, but Chrome had more to do with making sure the web remained the platform of choice for developers. And that that platform remained consistent and compatible across platforms. And it's worked. Microsoft's monopoly rem

  • by Lawrence_Bird ( 67278 ) on Thursday August 27, 2015 @08:02AM (#50401405) Homepage

    As another example, in late June they promised final snapshot images of CM11 for all devices. Yet relatively few actually got an update while their build system continued to churn out nightlies. Comments on the original blog post are ignored. Sure we all know it is free but don't promise people something if you have no intention of delivering on it.

    • by Mazhe ( 1599091 )
      Hell, not even counting the number of devices never updated to CM9... So much for expecting to have a longer phone support through CM, they can be as bad as phone sellers.
      • by c ( 8461 )

        So much for expecting to have a longer phone support through CM

        It's hit or miss...

        CM is pretty up-front about this; support for specific devices typically depends on a volunteer/champion who's willing to do the grunt work of testing and patching for that device. If that individual or team loses interest (or their devices croak or they just can't figure out how to work around critical bugs) and nobody is willing to step up and take over maintenance, the device can't be supported.

        Generally speaking, it seems

        • by Rob Y. ( 110975 )

          CM is obviously looking for a business model for monetizing their work. I can't completely fault them for that, but - assuming they're in this because they're open source and/or Android fans - selling out to Microsoft is a pretty lousy choice. Especially since it was Google's open sourcing of the OS that created the opportunity for them to exist in the first place.

          So how about this... Make your business one of supporting as many devices as you can for as long as there are users willing to pay for the sup

          • by c ( 8461 )

            CM is obviously looking for a business model for monetizing their work.

            I kind of thought that myself, until they screwed OnePlus with the Micromax deal. I understand the details are a bit more complicated, but alienating your most enthusiastic and visible client like that doesn't exactly strike me as something a company trying to make money would do.

            selling out to Microsoft is a pretty lousy choice

            If the goal is to ensure that many (most?) of the current "free" CM users don't turn into "paying" users throug

            • The CM Micromax Deal was dreadfully short sighted. While they gained Micromax, they pissed off a whole bunch of people. I would be on ColorOS if it weren't for a missing single feature I use regularly, single button screenshot. If they add that, I'll be off CM for good.

              • by c ( 8461 )

                The CM Micromax Deal was dreadfully short sighted.

                Well, that and the whole "a bullet through Googleâ(TM)s head" nonsense.

                Android is a big pool, but people still don't want to swim close to the guy who's pissing in it...

        • And sadly, unless you're buying the device well into its shelf life, you don't know about major flaws until they're discovered. At which point, you've just sunk several hundred dollars into a device that you'll need to replace in a couple years to stay on top of the current version.
          • by c ( 8461 )

            And sadly, unless you're buying the device well into its shelf life, you don't know about major flaws until they're discovered.

            I bought it well into the shelf life in spite of the known problems. The pros at the time outweighed the cons. But I didn't really consider the longevity of the community support. There are still people working on it, but not part of CM, and there are far fewer such projects than many other devices.

  • by wonkey_monkey ( 2592601 ) on Thursday August 27, 2015 @08:43AM (#50401689) Homepage

    Note: an update that the story reports has since been pulled.

    ...what?

    I know you don't take much care over the summaries in the first place, but you could at least make sure your ammendments make sense.

    • by Anonymous Coward
      It makes sense to me. I know; English is hard.
  • Note: an update that the story reports has since been pulled

    I think you accidentally a word.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Which of the following do you find hard to understand:

      the Cyanogen OS 12.1 update for Oneplus [ Note: an update that the story reports has since been pulled.]

      Note: The Cyanogen OS 12.1 update for Oneplus is an update that the story reports has since been pulled.

      The Cyanogen OS 12.1 update for Oneplus is an update that, as the story reports, has since been pulled.

      The Cyanogen OS 12.1 update for Oneplus has since been pulled, the story reports.

      The story reports that the update has since been pulled.

      The story reports that the update has been pulled since the story was first posted.

      • The first one, obviously, because that's what in the summary.

        The problem is with the "Note:" lead-in, which serves to separate the note from the preceeding sentence. It would have been slightly better to just put

        (an update that the story reports has since been pulled)

        But it's problematic regardless. The use of the word "update" is ambiguous, especially coming after "Note:". "Which" would have been a much better word choice than "that." "Reports" is also troublesome to parse, being both a verb and a noun. And so on.

        These are the things a decent news editor should

  • Serve your users (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 27, 2015 @09:27AM (#50401999)

    CyanogenMOD users are often of the hacker\tweaker variety. Android enthusiasts are often Google fans, but probably not Microsoft fans. Most of the hacker types I know HATE Microsoft as a residual feeling from their monopoly days. We didn't suddenly just start liking microsoft once they started losing.

    What brain damaged individual thought that Cyanogen users would be happy with Bing? Fuck Bing. No one is clammoring for Bing, least of all, hackers.

    • Accounting?

    • Bing
      Is
      Not
      Google

    • by HiThere ( 15173 )

      It's not residual, and it has less to do with their monopoly than with their business tactics. The monopoly just made their tactics much more abusive. They should have been disbanded as an abusive monopoly, instead they bribed the right politicians and were let off with their wrists being slapped gently with a single wet noodle.

  • by itsme1234 ( 199680 ) on Thursday August 27, 2015 @09:51AM (#50402189)

    Yes, very confusing I know.

    Cyanogen OS is some kind of bastard commercial branch for OnePlus (and possibly for a few more phones).
    The updates are a complete disaster, not only that you can't just get to OnePlus and easily see what to install and what's the latest version.

    On the other hand the "normal" CyanogenMod you can get for your S5 or many other hundreds of phones is (usually) absolutely fine.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      As a OnePlus user, this is an amusing and annoying distinction.

      I had used a couple of CyanogenMod's on my phones of yesteryear, and actually really liked their stability and features. While I don't usually have any issues with my OnePlus (at least, any more than any stock Samsung phone), some of those features are sorely missed. The baseline CyanogenMod I used was nicely integrated, assorted apps played well together and shared common interface elements. The OnePlus CyanogenOS feels like a halfway point bet

  • muTorrent does the same and changes default search engine
    "We are among many products that support the production and distribution of our free software through advertising..." http://forum.utorrent.com/topi... [utorrent.com]
    That's one way developers of free software get paid ...

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