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Google Power Hardware

Google Testing Smart Appliance, Would Compete With Nest Thermostat 139

Posted by timothy
from the getting-warm-in-here dept.
cagraham writes "Google is currently testing a web-connected thermostat, similar to the popular Nest Thermostat, according to The Information. The device would display energy usage details, and allow user's to control it from a web app. This actually marks the second time Google has ventured into home energy, after their PowerMeter web app that was shut down in 2011. Web connected devices could allow Google access to a treasure trove of data on people's daily habits and routines."
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Google Testing Smart Appliance, Would Compete With Nest Thermostat

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  • Web connected (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday December 17, 2013 @12:38PM (#45715261)

    It doesn't say Cloud-connected, but then this is Google, a cloudy company. If I can't say no to the Cloud connection, I don't want it. But I do want to connect to it using an open protocol.

  • Don't care... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by mythosaz (572040) on Tuesday December 17, 2013 @12:56PM (#45715509)

    Web connected devices could allow Google access to a treasure trove of data on people's daily habits and routines."

    Don't care.

    I went "all in" on Google a while ago, and I enjoy our current exchange of my personal data for their pretty damned awesome services.

    I know what I've given up, and I like what I got in return.

    If it's a cool thermostat, I'm in. Google already knows when I'm driving home. Let them turn on my air conditioner.

  • Re:Themostat (Score:4, Interesting)

    by mlts (1038732) on Tuesday December 17, 2013 @01:02PM (#45715605)

    I am a fan of the KISS principle.

    I like my refrigerator to keep things cold, perhaps make ice. Not act as a TV or entertainment center, nor share data with the world about the expiration date on the cottage cheese stashed in the crisper drawer [1]. Just run the refrigerant around in the tubes to move heat from the inside to the outside until it hits the right temperature, then stop doing so until the temperature warms up enough to restart the cycle.

    Same with my A/C or heater. Heat/cool until it hits the right temperature, stop, then resume working when the temperature rises or falls enough.

    I don't care to have to worry about additional Wi-Fi connections, security ramifications if the bad guys get on the internal Wi-Fi segment, mass data gathering. I want appliances to do their basic function, and that's that.

    The only connected exception would be smoke, water, and burglar alarms, and even then, it should only connect to a dedicated monitoring center and nowhere else.

    [1]: One rule -- if it gets on the Internet, it will eventually be public.

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